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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Which Hall-Effect sensor (stator) is in your distributor.
From left to right. New aftermarket stator, Used OEM stator, and New OEM stator.
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New aftermarket stator (left) vs. New OEM stator (right): The most important thing that you can't see would be the wire wrapping around the magnet. The magnet on the OEM stator is more powerful than the aftermarket stator. Why is this important? Because it's this produced signal that's used by the ECM for crankshaft position and where the ECM computes the desired spark advance based on engine demand and calibration.
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It may be hard to see in this picture (aftermarket on the left and OEM on the right). The internal diameter on the OEM pins is smaller which will make a better connection. The larger diameter on the aftermarket pin will have more resistance (looser fit) and could be another reason for their failure.
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Pictured below is the ground for the OEM harness which is made of better materials (tin-coated copper for the OEM and brass for the aftermarket).
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The OEM harness has a heat barrier/sleeve for their wires, not sure what's on the aftermarket harness but it could be heat-shrink. Not sure if that's a problem but the OEM piece looks to be more robust.
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Why is this important? Because it's becoming increasingly difficult to find a quality stator for those of us that use a distributor. The lack of a quality stator could affect the drivability, reliability, and performance on your Mustang. Stators for the 1987 to 1995 Mustangs are no longer produced. Which increases your chances of purchasing a knock-off (counterfeit) stator. Can't speak for 1987 to 1993 packaging but original 1994-95 Ford Motorcraft stators come in a bag with semi-cut holes at the bottom of the package on both the left and right side (front and back).
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I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
 

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How important is the stator when using the Pro-M coil-on-plug ignition?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
How important is the stator when using the Pro-M coil-on-plug ignition?
Great question.

A quick review on one of the main advantages of Coil-Near-Plug (CNP) ignition: The CNP ignition has many advantages but the biggest advantage is using multiple coils. A single-coil will have to charge and discharge 4 times per engine revolution. While a single coil in a Coil Pack system will only have to charge and discharge one time per engine revolution, and each coil in a CNP system will only have to charge and discharge one time for every two engine revolutions. I hope that makes sense.

Now the answer to your question: Even with the Pro-M CNP ignition, the stator is still important but not as important because the Pro-M EMS uses a strategy in the software to clean up the signal generated by crappy stators and another strategy to average out the crappy signal created by the poorly made aftermarket shutter wheels. Personally, I like to make sure I have quality OEM components when it comes to these two critical items in my Mustang.

In the near future, Pro-M will be releasing a kit that will allow you to convert the Windsor engines over to a true high data rate 36-1 crank trigger system. At that point, the crappy aftermarket shutter wheels and stators won’t matter at all (how nice). I'll talk about some of the features a little later on.

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
 

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Great question.

A quick review on one of the main advantages of Coil-Near-Plug (CNP) ignition: The coil near plug ignition has many advantages but the biggest advantage is using multiple coils. A single-coil will have to charge and discharge 4 times per engine revolution. While a single coil in a Coil Pack system will only have to charge and discharge one time per engine revolution, and each coil in a CNP system will only have to charge and discharge one time for every two engine revolutions. I hope that makes sense.

Now the answer to your question: Even with the Pro-M coil near plug ignition, the stator is still important but not as important because the Pro-M EMS uses a strategy in the software to clean up the signal generated by crappy stators and another strategy to average out the crappy signal created by the poorly made aftermarket shutter wheels. Personally, I like to make sure I have quality OEM components when it comes to these two critical items.

In the near future, Pro-M will be releasing a kit that will allow you to convert the Windsor engines over to a true high data rate 36-1 crank trigger system. At that point, the crappy aftermarket shutters and stators won’t matter at all (how nice). I'll talk about some of the features a little later on.

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
I didn't know the Pro-M software could clean up the signal from the stator. Good to know. I asked because I recently replaced mine in my 88GT with one that was allegedly a Ford piece. (was brand new and in Ford packaging). I was having an issue where my tach would bounce around at lower RPM so I thought I'd replace the usual suspects before they failed on me. I plan on getting my Pro-M system here pretty soon and want to get the COP setup. Should I wait to see when this newer 36-1 crank trigger setup will be available? How soon is the "near future"?
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Should I wait to see when this newer 36-1 crank trigger setup will be available? How soon is the "near future"?
That's your decision to make and yours alone.....your money, not mine's.

This is what I know, they are working on it along with other stuff but I will be given one of the prototypes to install and test when it's ready.

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
 

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Discussion Starter #6
FYI,
Stator part numbers from Ford Motorcraft
1987 to 1993 DU-30-C
1994 to 1995 DU-50
 

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In the near future, Pro-M will be releasing a kit that will allow you to convert the Windsor engines over to a true high data rate 36-1 crank trigger system. At that point, the crappy aftermarket shutter wheels and stators won’t matter at all (how nice). I'll talk about some of the features a little later on.
I plan on getting my Pro-M system here pretty soon and want to get the COP setup. Should I wait to see when this newer 36-1 crank trigger setup will be available? How soon is the "near future"?
The last coil on plug setup I did was on a 331 stoker. I used the 64bit Tuning Concepts SBF kit. It works great. Comes with everything you need except a crank pulley spacer. Setup is MS3 Pro, Box-R mpfi, Ford Motorcraft stock style cam sync, 64 bit tuning crank trigger kit (with a 2.2k pull up resistor between the 12v ref and signal), and stock LS1 style coils with stock LS coil brackets bolted to the valve covers. Setup works great.


In a picture below you can see the stock ford motorcraft cam sync.... But 64bit tuning also has a cam sensor on their site:


Not sure how it works in Pro M but in MS3 Pro there was a crank trigger reference angle offset. The car fired up first time and our reference angle was off a few degrees (Set for 5th tooth past missing tooth or 50degrees). We just used the reference angle offset value in the software to dial that in without touching or adjusting the crank sensor. The car was tuned at VMP performance and did 700whhp on around 12psi. Engine is setup for 24psi.

Crank Trigger kit:
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Installed. Ours required us to space it out some to get it just right.

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This is the 2.2k resistor spliced in, soldered and heat shrinked to the 12vref and signal wire:

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Sensor Installed 5th tooth past gap and correct air space:

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The stock ford motorcraft cam sync. Used a 12v ref but didnt need a pull up or pull down resistor:

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Wiring to it:

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Shot of the LS1 coils and engine bay:

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Hey GTO44,
Thanks for sharing your installation and photos on that 331 turbocharged Mustang and don't forget to pat yourself on the back, you did a fantastic job on the installation. 700rwhp @12PSI is no joke :eek:

Got some information from Pro-M Racing this morning (damn they are up early) their 36-1 crank trigger system can be used with either conventional single coil ignition systems, or with a CNP ignition system. So if I decide NOT to upgrade to CNP, I can still use my ignition setup. 😁

Thanks again for sharing
Michael Plummer
 

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What’s the differences between the 87-93 and 94-95? is because of the remote mount tfi on the 94-95
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I reached out to Pro-M Racing for more information on their 36-1 crank trigger kit and here's a summary of the information I received. Intended for 1986 through 1995 Mustangs (Windsor engine) using the following parts (timing cover, water pump, harmonic damper). This kit can be used with either conventional single coil ignition systems, or with coil near plug (CNP) ignition systems.

Now if you have a good distributor with an OEM Hall-effect/stator and an OEM or Pro-M Racing shutter wheel like I have then you're all set. But you will be missing out on the most important feature and that's the kit allows you to use a modern high data rate crank position input signal with your older engine. Basically, this means a more accurate and consistent spark advance.

The mounting location will accommodate modifications such as superchargers, relocated alternators, smog pump delete kits, and aftermarket pulleys, both with and without air conditioning. The thin design of the reluctor wheel also called a timing wheel or tone wheel spaces the crank pulley out from the damper less than one-tenth of an inch, eliminating the need to adjust the other pulleys forward to maintain proper alignment. The one exception to this is the water pump pulley but a spacer is provided for this........how nice. More information to follow when available.

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
 

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Great question.

A quick review on one of the main advantages of Coil-Near-Plug (CNP) ignition: The CNP ignition has many advantages but the biggest advantage is using multiple coils. A single-coil will have to charge and discharge 4 times per engine revolution. While a single coil in a Coil Pack system will only have to charge and discharge one time per engine revolution, and each coil in a CNP system will only have to charge and discharge one time for every two engine revolutions. I hope that makes sense.

Now the answer to your question: Even with the Pro-M CNP ignition, the stator is still important but not as important because the Pro-M EMS uses a strategy in the software to clean up the signal generated by crappy stators and another strategy to average out the crappy signal created by the poorly made aftermarket shutter wheels. Personally, I like to make sure I have quality OEM components when it comes to these two critical items in my Mustang.

In the near future, Pro-M will be releasing a kit that will allow you to convert the Windsor engines over to a true high data rate 36-1 crank trigger system. At that point, the crappy aftermarket shutter wheels and stators won’t matter at all (how nice). I'll talk about some of the features a little later on.

I hope this helps
Michael Plummer
Yes! Will this mean an end to the longer cranking time of the CNP system? If that can be fixed, then the greatest (my opinion) engine management system ever will have just become even better!

V/r, Jim T.
 
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