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If you got a convertor for a 157 tooth flex plate and it has no problem bolting to the flex plate, then you have a157 tooth flex plate. Your sure you have the small bellhousing? The best way to check what bellhousing you have, is to measure the depth of the bellhousing. You can search it on the internet, look for the ultimate C4 thread or something like that, then go to the bellhousing section. It will tell you the depth of both bellhousings. There are multiple different shaped 164 tooth bellhousings, one of them looks like a 157 tooth bellhousing. You are going to have to pull the transmission anyway, while you have the transmission out, measure the depth to make sure of what you have. If it is correct, then get a die grinder and grind the hole in the block plate out to a oval shape. Look at the flywheel and to see if the starter teeth are meshing too shallow or too deep, most likely if you have broken teeth, they are meshing too shallow. If so, you need to elongate the block plate hole towards the crank. If the teeth are meshing too deep, elongate the starter nose cone hole away from the crank.
Once you have that done, you will also need to elongate one of the starter bolt holes in the starter. I usually elongate the lower hole. So it will pivot off of the upper bolt, this will allow you to roll the starter in towards the ring gear, until the teeth mesh properly. Once it is correct, you can either just tighten the starter bolts very tight or go back and put some welds on the outboard side of the hole in the block plate, to keep the starter from shifting back away from the ring gear.
 

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If you got a convertor for a 157 tooth flex plate and it has no problem bolting to the flex plate, then you have a157 tooth flex plate. Your sure you have the small bellhousing? The best way to check what bellhousing you have, is to measure the depth of the bellhousing. You can search it on the internet, look for the ultimate C4 thread or something like that, then go to the bellhousing section. It will tell you the depth of both bellhousings. There are multiple different shaped 164 tooth bellhousings, one of them looks like a 157 tooth bellhousing. You are going to have to pull the transmission anyway, while you have the transmission out, measure the depth to make sure of what you have. If it is correct, then get a die grinder and grind the hole in the block plate out to a oval shape. Look at the flywheel and to see if the starter teeth are meshing too shallow or too deep, most likely if you have broken teeth, they are meshing too shallow. If so, you need to elongate the block plate hole towards the crank. If the teeth are meshing too deep, elongate the starter nose cone hole away from the crank.
Once you have that done, you will also need to elongate one of the starter bolt holes in the starter. I usually elongate the lower hole. So it will pivot off of the upper bolt, this will allow you to roll the starter in towards the ring gear, until the teeth mesh properly. Once it is correct, you can either just tighten the starter bolts very tight or go back and put some welds on the outboard side of the hole in the block plate, to keep the starter from shifting back away from the ring gear.
I told the poster to start measuring already, no word back on that
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The bellhousing is a small one. I know that for a fact. And the starter and bellhousing are the same ones I used on last engine. The only thing different this time around is the flexplate. It is a 157 tooth 28 ounce. And it sounds like now it is too far away from the flexplate because sometimes when I hit the key it won't even turn over the engine. It just makes an awful grinding sound. Looking at the teeth aside from 2 of them broken off, it looks like the bendix gear isn't getting close enough to the flexplate when engaging. Is this common? Should I just buy another flexplate? The last one I had was a B&M and it didn't give me a minutes trouble. But this PRW one has done nothing but make racket since the install.
 

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Best way to solve a problem is to watch it and see for your own eyes with the engagement with the help of another person activating the starter while you watch whats really going on from down below!
 

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Best way to solve a problem is to watch it and see for your own eyes with the engagement with the help of another person activating the starter while you watch whats really going on from down below!
why, when the math does it for ya?
 

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The bellhousing is a small one. I know that for a fact. And the starter and bellhousing are the same ones I used on last engine. The only thing different this time around is the flexplate. It is a 157 tooth 28 ounce. And it sounds like now it is too far away from the flexplate because sometimes when I hit the key it won't even turn over the engine. It just makes an awful grinding sound. Looking at the teeth aside from 2 of them broken off, it looks like the bendix gear isn't getting close enough to the flexplate when engaging. Is this common? Should I just buy another flexplate? The last one I had was a B&M and it didn't give me a minutes trouble. But this PRW one has done nothing but make racket since the install.
did you do any side by side measuring and comparing?
 

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Yes but the flywheel could be screwed up from damage done by the previous bad starter bendix /gear being shimmed which would then make the new starter do the same thing as the previous...
 

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reaching in my opinion.

pull the first starter do the math

get a second starter and do the math...

get a third starter, sell your tools and take it to a shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Well I have worked in many shops and never seen the first technician do any math. Simple math would be measuring the distance between the bendix gear and the flexplate. I have measured that and it's pretty close to where it needs to be. But for some reason the starter isn't close enough to the flywheel. And there is no way to really move it any closer without bootlegging my bellhousing. I can't watch it engage from underneath while cranking without an access hole to look in. So I guess wihile I'm pulling out the flexplate to replace it with another one I can replace the starter as well. Then do the math and see if it works with my handy tape measure! LOL
 

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I would measure from the rear (closest to the engine block) of the flex-plate to the rear (closest to the engine block) of the starter index plate. Call it A

Then measure from the starter mounting face to the kicked out starter gear. Call it B

The amount that B is greater than A is how much gear engagement you are getting.

Also I'd check the run-out on the ring gear, it could be the flex-plate is warped, resulting in sometimes the starter engages and sometimes not.
 

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Well I have worked in many shops and never seen the first technician do any math. Simple math would be measuring the distance between the bendix gear and the flexplate. I have measured that and it's pretty close to where it needs to be. But for some reason the starter isn't close enough to the flywheel. And there is no way to really move it any closer without bootlegging my bellhousing. I can't watch it engage from underneath while cranking without an access hole to look in. So I guess wihile I'm pulling out the flexplate to replace it with another one I can replace the starter as well. Then do the math and see if it works with my handy tape measure! LOL
I fit won't reach you have the wrong starter or flexplate.
 
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