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im just stating my experience . it cost me around 1000 bucks to have it all done and for the few ive done, theyve held up very well, most stay around 5 to 600 rwhp w/ the exception of 1 . i have a buddy w/ a dss 306 and strim, afr 185's , etc, he had them put the long block together w/ the heads, box stock , when he got it , they told him an anderson b41 would work w, no issues, POW bent valves doing his burnout in the box,im with you guys, if they dont know any better than that , they need to be washing cars not building engines. they also tried to tell him to throw 20 lbs. at it,, i talked him out of it. whew!!
 

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the BILLETT CRANK and neutral balance has more to do with longivity to ANY block more than anything else.
+1

And the lighter the rotating assembly as a whole, the better. It's not the power or even the rpm that kills them technically...it's trying to manage the weight (which is increased exponentially with rpm) of all the parts spinning around in there. Once it can't anymore, the caps walk and a short while later you have a split block.


Think about it like your valvetrain. You have a given set of springs...and in your motor with your cam they are good for say 6000rpm. Now add lightweight Jesel lifters, and titanium retainers. You just gained a substantial amount of rpm (assuming your induction and cam events can keep up). Now you add Jesel shaft rockers and titanium valves? Substantially more. The same spring can now handle more rpm simply because the effective weight of the valvetrain doesn't become enough to overpower the spring until a higher rpm. The bottom end on your block works the same way...only instead of working like a spring (bad bad mental image there lol)...picture it as the amount of abuse it can absorb before failing.


Cris :salute:
 

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+1

And the lighter the rotating assembly as a whole, the better. It's not the power or even the rpm that kills them technically...it's trying to manage the weight (which is increased exponentially with rpm) of all the parts spinning around in there. Once it can't anymore, the caps walk and a short while later you have a split block.


Think about it like your valvetrain. You have a given set of springs...and in your motor with your cam they are good for say 6000rpm. Now add lightweight Jesel lifters, and titanium retainers. You just gained a substantial amount of rpm (assuming your induction and cam events can keep up). Now you add Jesel shaft rockers and titanium valves? Substantially more. The same spring can now handle more rpm simply because the effective weight of the valvetrain doesn't become enough to overpower the spring until a higher rpm. The bottom end on your block works the same way...only instead of working like a spring (bad bad mental image there lol)...picture it as the amount of abuse it can absorb before failing.


Cris :salute:
makes sense, i just prefer the billet mains over the girdles coz the girdles doesnt address the weakest point of the block which is the main webbing. and i can get out relatively cheap compared to an aftermarket block that still has to have some machining
 

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you guys aint the first to try it.

even on a common and thicker "early" block ( pre 1975 ) oftentimes the cam bores itself get "flat sides" to them, and thus the cam bore does not stay round..

it is even more un predictable on a late "roller block"...
which is thinner.

back in the day, when there was NOTHING ELSE to buy except the original 1969 to 71 boss 302 block,
the main webs and overall thickness from cam bores to main saddles was DOUBLE thickness as compared to what a "late roller" block is today.

when there was no option other than the boss 302 block...we tried this...and the outer bolt holes / threads cracked the outer webs of block under the oil pan rails...


but if that is what you think / feel is what is needed to help your particular stress situation..then do it..

but in my opinion, it is a waste of time and effort...

today, just buy the better dart or world block....
 

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I somewhat agree with Sportinwoody, I would recommend billet main caps for the center three, as I have seen stock ones crack, but I don't know about 4 bolt main caps on such a thin block.
 

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This is for anyone doing a search regarding stock 5.0 late model blocks..

Been running mine since 2007, over 500hp and shifting at 7k with no problems. Balanced at 28oz car goes 6.80's in the 1/8
 

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From the various sources that I've read, anything over 550 crank HP or 6500rpm is going to require an aftermarket 5.0 block. Even below those numbers, there's no guarantee that the stock block won't split down the middle but the chances are much less.
I don’t know about the fox body blocks, but the SN series of 5.0’s uses dart’s 302 block. I’ve never seen one blow up even my buddies which is pushing 550 all motor
 

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SN95's do not use dart blocks. They are the same blocks as the fox body
When I looked up the block vin, the only company that had the vin number for my car's block was Dart, even ford didn't have it. I asked the owner of a relatively reputable mustang shop down here in Phoenix and he told me that the block was sand casted at Dart. The engine is stock with only minor mods (cam, exhaust, ect.) I'm just going by the info I have
 

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SN95's do not use dart blocks. They are the same blocks as the fox body
who knows tho, I might have jumped the gun seeing I have only owned my mustang for a few years and have no clue what the previous owner did to it. The engine could have had a meltdown in the past (typical AZ for you) and cooked the original block or something...
 

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When I looked up the block vin,e
Post up that block part number please. BYW, blocks do not have a "vin", at least Ford blocks do not. All Dart blocks have "DART" cast into the side of them. That is not to say that your car did not receive a transplant at some point and you assume that it is the original block.
 

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who knows tho, I might have jumped the gun seeing I have only owned my mustang for a few years and have no clue what the previous owner did to it. The engine could have had a meltdown in the past (typical AZ for you) and cooked the original block or something...
If you post a picture of the engine from the side we can pretty much tell you if it’s dart or not. They are much beefier where the cylinder bores are cast.

One things for sure though, if it’s a stock block it ain’t a dart.
 

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When I looked up the block vin, the only company that had the vin number for my car's block was Dart, even ford didn't have it. I asked the owner of a relatively reputable mustang shop down here in Phoenix and he told me that the block was sand casted at Dart. The engine is stock with only minor mods (cam, exhaust, ect.) I'm just going by the info I have
I have to ask....Is the shop owner's name Keith or does the shop names begin with "AMP"?
 

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It would be fun to hear people’s experiences with Mexican 302 blocks, 289 HiPo/K code and original Boss 302 blocks.
 
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