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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I want to supercharge my 4.6 2v (2000 mustang gt). I keep reading some superchargers are CCW or CW. What exactly does this mean? With CW does it mean that if you mount it facing the front the compressed air will flow to the drivers side instead of the passenger side (where throttle body input is)? Can you not get some custom piping to reroute the air?

I read this thread People who want to go Supercharger...READ

Are there any superchargers missing from the list in the old thread? Is there a difference in how much power these can help a stock 2v make? When the person talks about pulleys are they talking about the pulley on the crank or on the supercharger?
 

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go to your favorite supercharger manuf website, and buy the kit you want
 

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Search based upon your car.
clockwise is the direction the pulley needs to spin.
 

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A 2000 GT will use a Counter Clockwise rotation supercharger. ProCharger will refer to this as “reverse rotation” where Vortech calls it “CCW.” In a nutshell, the designation refers to the direction in which you spin the impeller and mount the blower. If the blower is mounted with the pulley on the front side of the engine, that’s “standard rotation” (like all other accessories) aka CW. If the blower is flipped around so that the pulley is on the back, the impeller will spin the opposite direction and be “reverse rotation” aka CCW. Again, your car will use a reverse rotation ProCharger or CCW Vortech.

That writeup you referenced is full of misinformation. I wouldn’t look at it again if I were you. That said, the person is talking about pulley sizes on the supercharger, not the crank.

For a stock engine, either a ProCharger P1SC or a Vortech S Trim is capable of making enough power to blow it up. The blowers above that level are overkill for stock. Stock engine, you’ll be high 300 rear wheel hp with either of the superchargers I mentioned.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A 2000 GT will use a Counter Clockwise rotation supercharger. ProCharger will refer to this as “reverse rotation” where Vortech calls it “CCW.” In a nutshell, the designation refers to the direction in which you spin the impeller and mount the blower. If the blower is mounted with the pulley on the front side of the engine, that’s “standard rotation” (like all other accessories) aka CW. If the blower is flipped around so that the pulley is on the back, the impeller will spin the opposite direction and be “reverse rotation” aka CCW. Again, your car will use a reverse rotation ProCharger or CCW Vortech.

That writeup you referenced is full of misinformation. I wouldn’t look at it again if I were you. That said, the person is talking about pulley sizes on the supercharger, not the crank.

For a stock engine, either a ProCharger P1SC or a Vortech S Trim is capable of making enough power to blow it up. The blowers above that level are overkill for stock. Stock engine, you’ll be high 300 rear wheel hp with either of the superchargers I mentioned.
When you say vortech s trim, would v2/v3 be ok too? V2/v3 sounds like a higher level to me unless they’re just newer versions?
 

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When you say vortech s trim, would v2/v3 be ok too? V2/v3 sounds like a higher level to me unless they’re just newer versions?
V1= loud straight cut gears, oil fed
V2= quiet gear set, oil fed
V3= quiet gear set, oil self contained

The trim level will determine how much HP they can produce. The most common ones in hp rating order are SCi, Si, Ti, YSi
 

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If you plan on spending a lot of time in boost (hard driving like a road course) you will want an oil fed supercharger and not self contained.
Self contained is just fine for spiried street driving.
Everybody will say go for the V3 SI, but the V3SCI gets overlooked a lot although it is not that much smaller. Both will be more than enough for a stock-ish mustang.

another option for a mod motor is Kenne Bell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
V1= loud straight cut gears, oil fed
V2= quiet gear set, oil fed
V3= quiet gear set, oil self contained

The trim level will determine how much HP they can produce. The most common ones in hp rating order are SCi, Si, Ti, YSi
Thanks

In google, type in “vortech supercharger comparison”
If you plan on spending a lot of time in boost (hard driving like a road course) you will want an oil fed supercharger and not self contained.
Self contained is just fine for spiried street driving.
Everybody will say go for the V3 SI, but the V3SCI gets overlooked a lot although it is not that much smaller. Both will be more than enough for a stock-ish mustang.

another option for a mod motor is Kenne Bell.
Thanks for your two replies. I will google what you said.

I prefer the oil fed supercharger as well but because I am looking at a used unit so I will buy either.

Why do some supercharger kits include a crank pulley that looks thicker than the normal one? Is it to run a separate belt for the supercharger? This would not be needed for vortech v1,v2,v3 or p1sc right? Also from looking at parts needed to complete a kit, it looks like its harder to find parts for the P1SC and much easier for the vortech, is this true?
Is there a way to tell what direction a supercharger spins just from pictures? Some sellers are selling the units without knowing or stating which way it spins or they have bought the kit for a different car so never cared for what direction it is because its a straight fit.

Like this picture
1619969246487.png


Am I right in thinking that this supercharger spins in "standard" or Clockwise direction because outlet of the supercharger is to the right (looking at the impeller/SC intake) and will not work on a 4.6 2v? or can you re-route/fabricate the air into the engine? Or pass it through an intercooler so it gets re-routed anyway. Unless the wrong rotation will end up with the supercharger sucking air instead of blowing it.
I think the 4.6 2v spins clockwise too (looking at front of engine).
 

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Ask for a pic of the ID tag. You can always call the manufacture and double check. They can also tell you when it was made and if it has been serviced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ask for a pic of the ID tag. You can always call the manufacture and double check. They can also tell you when it was made and if it has been serviced.
I did a compression test and the results are all over the place. I am doubting now to supercharge or not

The below results are with engine at operating temperature
Throttle body about 90-95% open because thats all I could get it to stay open with a screwdriver
All spark plugs out and fuel pump fuse out

Dry Test
Cyl 1 = 161 psi
Cyl 2 = 140 psi
Cyl 3 = 180 psi
Cyl 4 = 145 psi
Cyl 5 = 185 psi
Cyl 6 = 172.5 psi
Cyl 7 = 165 psi
Cyl 8 = 145 psi
lowest reading cylinder to highest reading cylinder difference = 45 psi, 24%

Wet Test
Cyl 1 = 185 psi
Cyl 2 = 195 psi
Cyl 3 = 195 psi
Cyl 4 = 190 psi
Cyl 5 = 201 psi
Cyl 6 = 190 psi
Cyl 7 = 195 psi
Cyl 8 = 175 psi
lowest reading cylinder to highest reading cylinder difference = 26 psi, 13%

According to ford service book the engine is within spec if the lowest is within 75% of the highest pressure. So the lowest pressure my engine can have is 139 psi but I thought it should be within 15%. I guess according to ford the engine is healthy enough to be NA but not boosted. Wet test results are more consistent.

Dont know if it makes a difference but at first I did the driver's side and forgot to open the throttle so cylinder 6 and 8 gave me 127 and 105 psi and cylinder 5 and 7 gave me 185 and 170 psi. It is recommended that you cycle your engine 5 times but for me the pressure kept rising until like 7-8 cycles for the entire test.
 

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V1= loud straight cut gears, oil fed
V2= quiet gear set, oil fed
V3= quiet gear set, oil self contained

The trim level will determine how much HP they can produce. The most common ones in hp rating order are SCi, Si, Ti, YSi
Do they make a quiet T-trim?
 

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You posted a pic of a standard rotation blower. You need one that spins the other way. The volute will be pointed in the opposite direction. Unless you want to get really inventive with brackets, you need reverse rotation. It has to do with the space you have available to mount the supercharger. All kits mount the blower in front of the engine on the pass side with the pulley on the back. Therefore you need reverse rotation.

I don’t agree on oil fed being superior to self contained, but really that’s a different topic and either will work fine for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You posted a pic of a standard rotation blower. You need one that spins the other way. The volute will be pointed in the opposite direction. Unless you want to get really inventive with brackets, you need reverse rotation. It has to do with the space you have available to mount the supercharger. All kits mount the blower in front of the engine on the pass side with the pulley on the back. Therefore you need reverse rotation.

I don’t agree on oil fed being superior to self contained, but really that’s a different topic and either will work fine for you.
Thanks! This explains things. I am guessing you cant just put a standard rotation on a bracket designed for reverse rotation and reroute the piping. What do you mean by pass side?

Do you also have any opinion of my compression test readings above (post 14)? The dry test is not very consistent but according to ford engine is ok.
 

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Thanks! This explains things. I am guessing you cant just put a standard rotation on a bracket designed for reverse rotation and reroute the piping. What do you mean by pass side?

Do you also have any opinion of my compression test readings above (post 14)? The dry test is not very consistent but according to ford engine is ok.
Correct. You cannot mount a standard rotation blower on a reverse rotation bracket. A reverse rotation bracket for these cars bolts to the front cover in front of the passenger side head. The blower is bolted on the front side of the bracket with the pulley toward the back lined up with all the other accessory pulleys. On standard rotation setups, the blower goes behind the bracket, not in front of it, so that the pulley faces forward.

Regarding the compression, a 25% spread is on the high side. Some might say 25% is the maximum allowable, and others might say 10%. The fact that the wet test greatly improved the results is suggestive that the rings aren't in the best shape. Now we are opening a whole can of worms... if it were my engine, I'd be rebuilding it. However, I wouldn't put stock pistons back in it. One thing would lead to another and money is going to add up very quickly. Judging by your previous comments, it sounds like you're on a tight budget and building a whole new engine likely isn't in the cards. I'm highly confident that there are many cars out there with a spread of 25% or more between cylinders that have bolted on blowers and gotten years of enjoyment out of them. Again, this isn't really my style, but there is nothing to say you can't install a blower now, start having fun, and then address a compression problem down the road if it gets worse.
 
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