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1990 Ford Mustang LX 351M powered!! Project Cherry Bomb!!
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Hey ho!!! Shout out from SW VA here!! Just got a 90 LX with 97k original miles on it. Originally a 4cyl car but someone crammed a 351M between the fenders of it!! Worst thing about it is the previous owners let it set for 10 years! I just had dropped the gas tank getting ready to swap in a new one and bang!! Had to go in hospital for a pacemaker!! Then a week after getting that done had to go back in for a week over double pneumonia that I cought from the surgery!! I'm still recovering from all that mess and it's killing me just wanting to get back out there and turn some wrenches on project Cherry Bomb!!
 

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Git urself healed/well and git back out there Werecow!!!!

Richard - yeah, been following. Age of Idiocy. Suspect some big Democratically controlled cities are about to find out what happens when you piss off ALL the police....
 

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I retired March this year. Every day that goes by , I know I made the right decision. I went in drank a cup of coffee and waited for everyone to come in. I then proceeded to say, "I'm out." That was the last thing I said, then I turned and hit the door. Those who needed to know, did.

I rolled the dice for too long, felt things getting uneasy lately, so I decided to walk.

When I started this career things were different. Everything in this business has you on egg shells these days. I didn't realize the stress I was under until my wife said a week after. " I like the retired you better." Cant imagine the dick Id been lately, to those who mean the most to me.

Good time ahead guys!
 

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Things seem to be coming apart at the hinges indeed.

Make sure you are implementing the 7P’s!
 

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"I retired March this year" --- what work/for what company?

I was a senior officer in a publicly traded company. Had to file an 8K with the SEC -- 6 months notice.
 

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Couldn't resist. So, let's say you paid $20,000.00 for your new 1993 Cobra SVT. And let's say you're able to sell it today for $75,000 -- as this guy is asking (which I don't think he'll get). Quick future value calculation shows that he earned a 5.017% return on his investment. And that assumes there were no costs at all to preserve, maintain and insure the car. Shows you just how tough it is to truly make decent returns "investing" in cars.
 

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Absolutely, micheal. Doesn’t count insurance or anything else. The guys that do it right will get in when price is low on them (maybe ten years old or so) and sell in ten years or so. Never buy cars as an investment, buy them because you like them and if you get lucky you might make a little. Right now, guys are buying and flipping after a bit of restoration and making couple thousand or so.
 

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I bought my Ranchero running for $350 in 1988. If I had thought of it as an investment, I might have left it intact and just maintained it. Now if you can find one, they cost $10k minimum as complete vehicles.

I don't have time or space for extra cars to just keep to sell as they were.
 
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An example I’ll throw out is terminator cars (03-04). Five years ago, those cars were bottomed out even bone stock. But now they are heading right on up. They will be the next big thing in another five years or so. Especially stock because very few were stock.
 

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But even so, someone that buys like that isn’t making a living at it. They like the cars and are lucky enough to pick the right one and make a little money on it.
 

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"someone that buys like that" - define?

Three factors determine value -- desirability, condition and rarity. Most of the contemporary collectibles (for argument's sake, let's throw the Terminators into that category) were produced in such relatively large numbers that "rarity" won't occur for many, many years to come. Doesn't mean someone couldn't turn a profit on one. But to truly earn a decent return (I can earn 5% in the markets all day long) -- it has to be bought extremely well and sold for a lot more....relatively quickly. The passage of time is the enemy of a good/quick return on the investment.

And of course, all that's relative. If the experts think a $500,000 car can easily be worth $1-1.5 mil over the course of the next year or two -- that's a "decent" return. ;) Of course, it doesn't always work out that way. And the folks making a living at it can't hold them forever - they want their capital working for them. They're more likely to move them along and get their money working on the next good deal.

Increasingly, people making money on the sale of collectibles aren't taking much risk at all. They're simply providing a marketing service and taking a cut of the sale price whatever it may be. Look at the rise of all the auction houses and places like RK Motors, Streetside Classics, etc. all over the country. The individual owners take all the buy/sell risk -- the auction/consignment shop gets a cut no matter what.

If you take an internal-rate-of-return calculator and start actually looking at accurate numbers --- it's a very tough business to be in. Even for the handful of folks that know what they're doing.
 

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"someone that buys like that" - define?

Three factors determine value -- desirability, condition and rarity. Most of the contemporary collectibles (for argument's sake, let's throw the Terminators into that category) were produced in such relatively large numbers that "rarity" won't occur for many, many years to come. Doesn't mean someone couldn't turn a profit on one. But to truly earn a decent return (I can earn 5% in the markets all day long) -- it has to be bought extremely well and sold for a lot more....relatively quickly. The passage of time is the enemy of a good/quick return on the investment.

And of course, all that's relative. If the experts think a $500,000 car can easily be worth $1-1.5 mil over the course of the next year or two -- that's a "decent" return. ;) Of course, it doesn't always work out that way. And the folks making a living at it can't hold them forever - they want their capital working for them. They're more likely to move them along and get their money working on the next good deal.

Increasingly, people making money on the sale of collectibles aren't taking much risk at all. They're simply providing a marketing service and taking a cut of the sale price whatever it may be. Look at the rise of all the auction houses and places like RK Motors, Streetside Classics, etc. all over the country. The individual owners take all the buy/sell risk -- the auction/consignment shop gets a cut no matter what.

If you take an internal-rate-of-return calculator and start actually looking at accurate numbers --- it's a very tough business to be in. Even for the handful of folks that know what they're doing.
I was adding to my post above. I think you’ve got the guys that flip them with intent to make a living doing it (6-12 month turnover or less). Then you have the guys that “collect” them for 8-10 years until the next thing comes along and they sell the ones they are tired of looking at. Those guys can often get lucky and make a little bit or break even if they choose wisely. I’m seeing a lot of 93 Cobras changing hands every few years as the second group of guys are intersted in them for a while and then move on. And any time a super hot/exclusive ford comes out (like the newest gt500) you see an influx of older cars hitting market to make room for the newest one. An interesting business for sure.
 

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Gotcha. My point is that few truly consider the time-value of money when they're talking/thinking about 'investments' in cars/trucks.
 
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