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:ROFLMAO:
 

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I had heard that too - but Wiki indicates differently. It was another Japanese invasion....LOL! I believe the cattle connection occurred when folks realized in places it had been planted to help with soil erosion, they had a big problem on their hands.

"The kudzu plant was introduced to the United States from Japan in 1876 at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.[7][8][14] Kudzu was introduced to the Southeast in 1883 at the New Orleans Exposition. The vine was widely marketed in the Southeast as an ornamental plant to be used to shade porches,[7][15] and in the first half of the 20th century, kudzu was distributed as a high-protein content cattle fodder and as a cover plant to prevent soil erosion." "Kudzu was intentionally introduced to North America by the Soil Erosion Service and Civilian Conservation Corp in 1876 for the purpose of controlling soil erosion in Pennsylvania.[7] When kudzu was first introduced in the southeast, it was initially used as an ornamental vine to shade homes. By the early 20th century, southerners began to use kudzu for purposes other than ornamentation and so kudzu began to come closer in contact with the land which, in turn, encouraged its spread throughout the southeast." From the same article - mature, established plants can grow vines at the rate of 1 FOOT PER DAY.

In Japan's cold climate, it dies back so far in the winter, it can't expand very far during the summer. But in the southeast U.S., in many locations, it's not even a perennial anymore. I've . Like bamboo -- pretty tough to get rid of once established. I've always thought a movie short -- Sat Night Live style -- called "Bamboo versus Kudzu" in an old Japanese-style "Godzilla vs. whatever" could be pretty funny.

Is there anything we don't cover in this thread?
I can take you some pictures of Bambi close up. I mow my next door neighbor's yard, and the one next to it has a small Bamboo forest. It is mature and spreads under ground, shoots pop up several feet into the adjacent yard. The stuff grows very fast and the short young sprouts are often 2" in diameter.

You could not fight your way through the dense Bamboo, as it stands so close together. It's easily 15-20 feet high, and I often have to cut some down in my neighbor's yard. It's working its way around the outside of the fence, between two fences. So before long it will be well into three neighbor yards, and I'm seeing it as far as about 30 feet inside my neighbor's fence. The roots obviously don't mind going horizontally for long distances.
 

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It’s all over the place here. We used to roll a disagreeable neighbor’s yard with TP. Now I quietly plant bamboo in their backyard at night. The gift that keeps on taking....
 

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It's wild. I haven't tried to kill it in any way, I've just mowed it since it's not my yard. If it was actually next door I'd likely be trying something soon.

I already have one unkillable weed I put up with. It's called Virginia buttonweed. It has roots that are like rubber bands, which grow deep and are fragile. If you do not remove the entire plant and every bit of the root, it grows back. In 1998 there was a chemical that was listed as able to kill it, but at $200 a quart I passed. Now it's not available because of regulations, so nothing can kill this stuff.
 

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It's wild. I haven't tried to kill it in any way, I've just mowed it since it's not my yard. If it was actually next door I'd likely be trying something soon.

I already have one unkillable weed I put up with. It's called Virginia buttonweed. It has roots that are like rubber bands, which grow deep and are fragile. If you do not remove the entire plant and every bit of the root, it grows back. In 1998 there was a chemical that was listed as able to kill it, but at $200 a quart I passed. Now it's not available because of regulations, so nothing can kill this stuff.
You should import some panda bears. :)
 

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Lol
 

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So, how is everyone weathering the riot stuff? I think knoxville had some minor property damage. Nothing in little Sweetwater/Monroe county.
 

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Here in the Foxcroft "hood" all is quiet. However, there was quite a bit of shenanigans in downtown Charlotte over the past few nights. They call it "uptown".
 

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So, anyone remember the “Shogun”? 89 ford festiva with a Taurus’s sho drivetrain in it. Oh, and the engine was in the rear. That would be a fun idea, stuff a v6 into the back of the geo.
 
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Jay actually mentioned the R5. He said the shogun would blow it away lol. He added a 90hp progressive nitrous system to his too lol.
 

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The street version of the R5 was offered to homologate the car for the World Champion Rally series at the time. The Renault and the Festiva were similar sized cars -- the R5 a turbo 1.4L - 158HP. The Shogun had a naturally aspirated 3.0L V6 - 220HP. So, yeah, the Shogun would be quicker than the street/stock version of the R5. The WRC rally versions were making closer to 300-350HP --- they actually won 5 or 6 times in the era of Audi turbo quattros -- so, quite the little beast. Almost 5000 R5's were built -- only 7 Shoguns. Great article here about the origins of the Shogun.... SHO-Time: The Original Festiva SHOgun | Articles | Grassroots Motorsports

 

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Huge strong money on this. Don’t miss the drivetrain....

 

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Wow
 

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Forgot to mention we went to Myrtle beach with the camper and got back this past Sunday.

The aftermarket Wagner intercooler is amazing. 1700 rpm, 7psi sustained pulls for several hours at a time. Intake air temp ran no more than 20° over ambient air temp. That is a huge deal on sustained runs like that where heat soak can be an issue.

Eventually I may upgrade the radiator as well. Turbos are water cooled so things can get hot quickly if you ar ET careful. I never saw higher than 231°, but watched it like a hawk on uphill pulls. Normal rolling hills aren’t an issue but black mountain is if I want to maintain 60mph going up. Too much boost. I drop back to 45mph generally.
 
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