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These tires are too old for any meaningful NOS hits. Then tires already have no traction with 1/10th throttle. Desperately need fresh rubber but I have a mower to buy .... 8-( and :cool:

I plan to wait for fresh tires. I think they are the Nitto NTs if memory serves. Never had an issue in the rain with these either but those times are few and far between. When fresh it’s like she’s on rails!
 

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These tires are too old for any meaningful NOS hits. Then tires already have no traction with 1/10th throttle. Desperately need fresh rubber but I have a mower to buy .... 8-( and :cool:

I plan to wait for fresh tires. I think they are the Nitto NTs if memory serves. Never had an issue in the rain with these either but those times are few and far between. When fresh it’s like she’s on rails!
I'm still running my snow tires on my route truck, they are over 10 years old. They are almost worn out finally after three months, but wow I've loved them in the rain. Sticky rubber is so much better than regular or cheap tires, and even old these are still very good.

I bought the new Cooper Winter tire about six weeks ago, they were only $300 for the set, in a 235/70/16 size. They were selling out for the season and they had way too many. I like a 245/70/16 but those were kind of rare then and cost about $430 at best for a set then. So for a Winter tire I might use full time and it won't last long, it's worth the savings.

I have a 2nd set of snow tires I haven't used yet, now they're two seasons old. I bought them in December of 2018, and the two Winters have been really mild.
 
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Yep “thar ‘tis!” Small nail or something.
 

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Lil Buggar!
 

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I plug my own tires you may know. But only do tires that you trust are high quality and not along the sidewalls. I've had to do one about every two weeks on average on this route I'm on. It covers all of Newport Hwy in Sevier County, so I drive along the emergency lane a lot.

As said don't drive high speeds with plugged tires, the belts are slightly damaged when you insert the tire reaming tool. That is used to make sure the hole is big enough for the plug and inserting tool, to go in properly. The commercial one I use is about 1/4" in diameter, it's easy to use but you do feel the belts being damaged some when you push it in. So avoid plugging if you can, just know local shops will be more rough in how they do it(they don't care about you). Having an internal patch is safer because there is no extra belt damage beyond what the screw/nail did. They remove some rubber on the inner surface with a rotating disc of some kind, and glue the patch to the inside. High end types now have a tiny plug built onto the patch, which has to be forced through the hole. I've never had that done or seen one in person.

The main point is the belt damage caused by both the screw/nail etc, and the reaming tool used to plug the hole.
 

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That looks like an old rusty nail to me, the stuff I've been picking up lately has been newish screws of various sizes, and maybe one nail in ages. The weirdest I saw lately was a large rafter hanger, or what is used on fence posts to straddle/hold down fencing. It's a "U" shaped thing, sharp jagged pointed on each end.

The one I caught looked like a bent over nail, until I began pulling it out. Then I saw it had pierced the tire twice, and I carefully pulled just one end out first. I plugged that hole and then got another plug loaded up, before pulling the monster out fully. It looked like a huge hog ring, about like a 2.5" galvanized steel nail bent over, about 3/16" thick steel. That I think came from a customer's gravel driveway, a part that went off to their farm land.
 
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I am not worried about not having a patch. High acceleration or cornering antics wait upon new tires. I will remember the patch idea for next time however. Thanks guys.
 

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Chris - regarding zero turn and thirty degree slope. I would go with a good tractor style with foot locking differential. The commercial guys mow that slope because they have big and heavy mowers. Price range you are looking at won’t be as heavy. For example, dads zero turn is 1800#. Not a typo. It has super low center gravity and big tires (26”) for traction. With a zturn, traction is huge. If you lose traction with downhill tire while going crossways on a slope, the nose shoots downhill immediately due to uphill tire pushing it around. If there’s a dropoff, you will go off. There is no stopping with lack of traction. One small part of my yard is at about thirty degrees. If It was more, id go with a good tractor type. Simplicity makes a very good tractor style and can get a quality unit at 5k or so.

Weight and traction is king on zturns when slopes are involved. Turning around at end of a turn on a slope can also cause major issues. Tears yard up and sometimes simply spins when trying to get nose pointed uphill. It’s challenging. I only have about five passes with that much slope and that’s all I would want.
 
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Goats are weed eaters. Literally. They don’t eat grass. They are awesome, however, for cleaning fence rows out.
 

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Goats are weed eaters. Literally. They don’t eat grass. They are awesome, however, for cleaning fence rows out.
Do you mean you actually have grass? Wow, most of what I see around here is all weeds, Dallas grass and Crabgrass, Clover, Fescue, hell, Bermuda most people call a weed. I've got some Zoysia seeping around, but it's tough to see past the weeds.

Will goats eat Kudzu, we could tie the goats to lots of hillsides along highways.
 

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Do you mean you actually have grass? Wow, most of what I see around here is all weeds, Dallas grass and Crabgrass, Clover, Fescue, hell, Bermuda most people call a weed. I've got some Zoysia seeping around, but it's tough to see past the weeds.

Will goats eat Kudzu, we could tie the goats to lots of hillsides along highways.
yep! They sure do. Article is a couple of years old.

 

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Lol! Nice reading, thanks guys!

I have a buddy bringing by his Toro 2500 commercial for me to try out. That should answer it easily.

Just opened up my Spicer transaxle to figure out what failed on wifey. Gears look great! No sign of wear. I think perhaps the shift fork ran low on grease and bound up? I removed most of old grease to repacked it tonight with some Amsoil high load synthetic. Should know this weekend if that helps.

Be nice to sell it to someone with a flatter lawn than mine and get $500 for it. Found ads for $600 in worse looking shape than mine.
 

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It seems to shift easy now but we’ll see when there is load applied. The chain was somewhat loose but otherwise looked great.
 

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Yep, kudzu was originally brought over for cattle. Then got out of hand. Whoops.
 

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I had heard that too - but Wiki indicates differently. It was another Japanese invasion....LOL! I believe the cattle connection occurred when folks realized in places it had been planted to help with soil erosion, they had a big problem on their hands.

"The kudzu plant was introduced to the United States from Japan in 1876 at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.[7][8][14] Kudzu was introduced to the Southeast in 1883 at the New Orleans Exposition. The vine was widely marketed in the Southeast as an ornamental plant to be used to shade porches,[7][15] and in the first half of the 20th century, kudzu was distributed as a high-protein content cattle fodder and as a cover plant to prevent soil erosion." "Kudzu was intentionally introduced to North America by the Soil Erosion Service and Civilian Conservation Corp in 1876 for the purpose of controlling soil erosion in Pennsylvania.[7] When kudzu was first introduced in the southeast, it was initially used as an ornamental vine to shade homes. By the early 20th century, southerners began to use kudzu for purposes other than ornamentation and so kudzu began to come closer in contact with the land which, in turn, encouraged its spread throughout the southeast." From the same article - mature, established plants can grow vines at the rate of 1 FOOT PER DAY.

In Japan's cold climate, it dies back so far in the winter, it can't expand very far during the summer. But in the southeast U.S., in many locations, it's not even a perennial anymore. I've . Like bamboo -- pretty tough to get rid of once established. I've always thought a movie short -- Sat Night Live style -- called "Bamboo versus Kudzu" in an old Japanese-style "Godzilla vs. whatever" could be pretty funny.

Is there anything we don't cover in this thread?
 

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Lol we cover it all here, for sure.
 
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